How many types of SSL certificates are available?

There are 3 types of SSL certificates: domain-validated (DV), extended-validation (EV) and organization-validated (OV). DV SSL certificates are the most basic type and only verify the ownership of the domain name. OV SSL certificates provide more information about the website’s organization and are more expensive than DV certificates. EV SSL certificates are the most expensive and provide the highest level of security and trust. They require a thorough verification process and display a green address bar in the user’s web browser to show that the website is legitimate. The wildcard certs are the type of certificate that allows the holder to secure any subdomains under a specific domain, rather than just a single, specified subdomain.

SSL certificates use two types of keys: a public key and a private key. The public key is used to encrypt data that is transmitted between the server and the web browser, while the private key is used to decrypt the data. The private key must be kept secret and secure, as anyone with access to it can decrypt the data and potentially steal sensitive information.

When a user accesses a website with an SSL certificate, the web browser checks the certificate to ensure that it is valid and has not been tampered with. If the certificate is valid, the web browser establishes a secure connection with the server and the website is displayed to the user. If the certificate is not valid, the web browser will display a warning message to the user and prevent them from accessing the website.

Why is it called SSL certificate?

An SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate is a type of digital certificate that is used to establish a secure, encrypted connection between a web server and a client browser. The main purpose of an SSL certificate is to provide security for data transmitted over the internet, such as credit card numbers, login credentials, and other sensitive information.

The term “SSL” refers to the Secure Sockets Layer protocol, which was developed by Netscape in the 1994s as a way to secure online communications. The SSL protocol uses a combination of public key and symmetric key encryption to ensure the confidentiality and integrity of data transmitted over the internet.

When a client browser connects to a web server that has an SSL certificate installed, the server and the browser negotiate a secure connection using a process called the “SSL handshake.” This process involves the exchange of keys and the establishment of a secure, encrypted connection between the two parties.

One of the main benefits of SSL certificates is that they help to protect against man-in-the-middle attacks, in which a third-party intercept and attempts to alter the data being transmitted between a server and a client. SSL certificates also help to prevent phishing attacks, in which a malicious party poses as a legitimate website in order to obtain sensitive information from unsuspecting users.

In summary, the term “SSL certificate” refers to a digital certificate that is used to establish a secure, encrypted connection between a web server and a client browser using the SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) protocol. This helps to protect against man-in-the-middle attacks and phishing attacks, and ensures the confidentiality and integrity of data transmitted over the internet.